Plants That Ward Off Death

January 23, 2014

succulents

There is nothing green about my thumbs. I’m not even a fan of green nail polish. But when I met the boyfriend — who is of the mindset that a house is not a home unless it resembles a jungle — my perspective changed.

I now appreciate why plants are nice to have around. 1) They’re cheery to look at and help purify the air, by increasing oxygen and decreasing toxins. 2) Houseplants are proven stress reducers. 3) If you live in an urban place devoid of foliage (or covered in ice, as the case may be) it helps to bring a little bit of nature indoors.

My newly-positive attitude towards plants is also due to my discovery of succulents. Succulents are fleshier than other plants, which helps them retain water and survive in neglectful, ah-hem, dry conditions. The beauty of succulents can be summed up in two points:

  1. They are cute.
  2. They do not die.

Seriously. These little guys do NOT want to die. They’re even easier than air plants, which I’ve managed to kill more than once. (If anyone understands air plants, please let me know. They live in the air, but require just the right amount of water. Confounding.)

9a

An intimate look at a few of the plants I have not killed lately.

Here is a quick breakdown of a few succulent favorites:

Cacti – They come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. Bonus: the more you ignore them, the more they seem to like you!

Jade – Not only hardy as heck, these can propagate new plants from fallen leaves or cuttings.

Aloe – If you scrape or burn yourself, or attack an evil blemish, just cut off a tiny section of aloe to use as a miraculous salve. It won’t mind!

Echeveria – These are showing up everywhere lately – in flower arrangements, at weddings, and obviously, in my house. Why? Because they’re pretty. They almost look like big green flowers.

If you’ve been hesitant to become a plant parent, get on the succulent train. Not only will they ward off death, they might even grow! It will be so rewarding for the both of you.

P.S. Here’s a great book for developing your own healthy relationship with succulents.

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